Program

Scroll down to see a full description of individual workshops.

TIME SESSION SESSION SESSION SESSION
9:00-9:30 Breakfast and Registration [Adler Journalism Building Rotunda]
9:30-10:00 Introduction/Opening Remarks [Adler Journalism Building Auditorium E105]
10:15-11:45 Workshop 1 — Experiments
with Web-Based Multimedia Projects: Student Work with Omeka and Google Sites

David Tompkins, Carleton College
[Library 3092]
Workshop 2 — Leveraging
the Power of Games in the Classroom: Creating a Course Achievement System

Cody Reeves, The University of Iowa
[Adler W340]
Workshop 3 – Writing for Wikipedia: Using the Global Encyclopedia as a Pedagogical Tool
Björn Anderson, The University of Iowa
[Adler W336]
Workshop 4 – Virtual Worlds in Implementation and Practice: A Case Study of the OS Grid
James Elmborg, The University of Iowa
[Library 1015-A]
12:00-1:15 Roundtable 1 — Engaging
a Diverse Public through the Digital Classroom

Moderator: Nikki Dudley
Participants: Jacki Thompson Rand, Bridget Draxler, Jon Winet
[Adler Auditorium E105]
Roundtable 2 — Podcasts, Radio and Recording in the Classroom
Moderator: Christine Norquest
Participants: Omar Valerio-Jiménez, Noaquia Callahan, Sylvea Hollis, Jeff Porter
[Library 3083]
Roundtable 3 — Bringing Digital Archives and Research to the Classroom
Moderator: Kelly Thompson
Participants:
Stephen Voyce, Colleen Theisen, Bob Cargill
[Adler E120]
1:15-2:30 Lunch [Adler Journalism Building Rotunda]
2:30-4:00 Workshop 5 — Teaching through Public Writing and Social Media
Jennifer Shook, The University of Iowa
[Adler W336]
Workshop 6 — Recovering Strangeness: Teaching Against the Ahistorical Image
Jane Simonsen, Augustana College
[Adler E120]
Workshop 7 – Epic Geographies: HGIS Tools for the Humanities Classroom
Christopher Polt, Carleton College
[Library 1015-A]
Workshop 8 – Managing Course Websites: An Introduction to WordPress and the Logistics of Online Learning
Craig Carey, The University of Iowa
[Adler W340]
4:15-4:45 Closing Remarks/Final Discussion [Adler Journalism Building Auditorium E105]

The following rooms are available for work / conversation / hacker space:
Library 2057 and 2058, 10:00am – 4:45pm
Adler E250, 8:30am – 3pm


 
WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS

Workshop 1 (Tompkins) – Experiments
with Web-Based Multimedia Projects: Student Work with Omeka and Google Sites

This workshop will start with a brief overview of the benefits and challenges of working with student websites as course projects. I will share examples from two of my first-year seminars, on music and politics, and on visual images and communism. We will then look at two user-friendly programs that enable the construction of web pages, Google Sites and Omeka, and experiment with building a basic site.

Workshop 2 (Reeves) — Leveraging the Power of Games in the Classroom: Creating a Course Achievement System

Among the more marked trends in society today is the steady expansion of the computer and video game industry.  Building upon the work of scholars who have examined the use of game design elements in non-game contexts, Cody Reeves and Ken Brown designed a course feedback system similar to those used by the location-based social networking site Foursquare and modern gaming consoles.  In this presentation, Cody will briefly introduce the principles of gaming that were incorporated into this achievement system, preview the system that was created, present the surprisingly positive feedback from students, and offer hands-on instruction for how to create a similar system.

If you are bringing your own laptop/tablet to this workshop, you will need to install Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, and Microsoft Outlook beforehand.  All participants will have access to computers with this software pre-installed.

This workshop will make use of these files: https://dl.dropbox.com/u/98858805/Reeves_Games.zip

Workshop 3 (Anderson) – Writing for Wikipedia: Using the Global Encyclopedia as a Pedagogical Tool

Wikipedia, the open online encyclopedia which anyone can edit, is among the most visited sources of information on the web.  With over 4 million articles in English, it has articles on nearly every topic the user can imagine.  The open nature of the site has made it the subject of criticism, of course, as it is patently and intentionally not the product of scholars or specialists but rather the general public.  Issues such as the quality of writing, accuracy of information, and ease of vandalism are highlighted by Wikipedia itself as problem areas, and the reliability of the site in regards to academic research has frequently and justifiably been called into question.  Even so, its popularity, coverage, and ease of access have made it an inescapable aspect of public  education and discourse.  In this workshop, we will explore the issues involved in engaging students as authors for Wikipedia, both positive and negative.  We will also discuss the practical pedagogy of the process.

This workshop will make use of these files: https://dl.dropbox.com/u/98858805/Anderson_Wiki.zip

Workshop 4 (Elmborg) – Virtual Worlds in Implementation and Practice: A Case Study of the OS Grid

Virtual Worlds have been gaining in popularity through such games as World of Warcraft and Second Life. These games feature immersive activities taken up by avatars in narratives supplied either by the game itself or created by the players. James Gee has identified a variety of educational objectives for such games. First off, these games require players to take a “projective stance” toward the game. They simulate activities one might encounter in worlds outside the game, especially highly constructed worlds like classrooms. They provide opportunities for practicing activities before going “live” in more high stakes environments. This workshop will demonstrate the OS Grid, a virtual environment developed for use in educational settings. Basic information about how OS Grid works will be provided. Participants will be given an opportunity to create an avatar and learn how to use and think about pedagogical implementations of these virtual worlds.

If you are bringing your own laptop/tablet to this workshop, you will need to install Imprudence (http://wiki.kokuaviewer.org/wiki/Downloads) and configure to connect to OS Grid beforehand.   For instructions, watch this video, courtesy of Jen Eilers and Multimedia 021:123:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QllgIWkiBFg.  You will also need a video card on your device that is powerful enough to render OS Grid.  All participants will have access to computers with this software pre-installed.

Workshop 5 (Shook) – Teaching through Public Writing and Social Media

This workshop will introduce social media platforms and assignment ideas, with examples of WordPress, Pinterest, Twitter, Tumblr, YouTube, and other projects promoting public engagement, collaboration, and archival research.

Workshop 6 (Simonsen) — Recovering Strangeness: Teaching Against the Ahistorical Image

Many of us incorporate images into our teaching as a way of connecting to the visually literate students in our classroom. But image-savvy students are rarely aware of the culture of imagery itself as it penetrates our thinking, turning photographs into a handy shorthand that erases as much as it brings to light.  In this workshop, we’ll develop tactics for moving beyond images as illustrations, using them instead as a way to generate critical and self-reflective thinking about a technologically-saturated society; we’ll generate assignments that can be used not only in the history classroom, but in writing, literature, gender studies, and other humanities courses.

Workshop 7 (Polt) — Epic Geographies: HGIS Tools for the Humanities Classroom

While digital technologies are helping to remove many of the physical barriers we once faced, they have also dulled our sense – and perhaps more strongly our students’ sense – of the importance of physical space: we may experience our friends more often over Facebook and Skype than over tea and coffee, our music and files can live in the Cloud rather than on our desks, etc. But technology giveth even what it taketh away, and in this workshop we will explore some ways we can use software not only to restore physicality to the classroom, but also to offer students an even richer sense of space than they could get in-person. We will focus primarily on Google Earth but will also touch briefly on several other useful software packages, discussing their benefits and drawbacks, and will spend much of our time experimenting hands-on. No prior experience with GIS or Google Earth is necessary, and though we will approach the technology from a Humanities perspective, this workshop will be potentially fruitful for teachers and scholars from across the disciplines.

If you are bringing your own laptop/tablet to this workshop, you will need to install Google Earth beforehand.  All participants will have access to computers with this software pre-installed.

Workshop 8 (Carey) – Managing Course Websites: An Introduction to WordPress and the Logistics of Online Learning

A recent study published in the journal Science, Technology, & Human Values found that college educators primarily use technology for logistical purposes rather than to enhance learning.  What this and other studies ignore, however, is how learning itself is always a logistical process, a complex operation involving people, property, data, tools, and technologies.  In this workshop, we will challenge the distinction between logistics and learning by surveying the possibilities for producing and organizing forms of knowledge through a course website.  We will begin with a brief overview of WordPress, WordPress plugins, and other logistical media that educators can used to augment how students read, write, and learn online.  We will then devote time to hands-on instruction with WordPress, exploring different assignments and activities you can create with the platform.  Participants will leave with the basic skills needed to create, edit, and manage their own course website.

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